EMAIL: How to Send It, Write It, Share It

Originally posted on Dr. Kassorla's Blog:

EMAIL:  How to Send It, Write It, Share ItI was shocked by a revelation by my friend, Frederick Cope, that many of the students he teaches do not know how to email.  “WHAT?” I said.  (I’m still in shock, really.)

I’m in shock mostly because Frederick doesn’t teach the elderly, and he doesn’t teach K-12.  Frederick is an Assistant Professor of English at a Community College.  He teaches college students.  You know, the “Millennials,” the Wunderkinder of social media.  Yeah, them.

So, what is the deal with email?  Why don’t they know how to use it?  It is, after all, a basic digital skill.  But, as I thought it over, I realized that my teen kids don’t really email.  So, perhaps email passed them by?  Their generation wasn’t taught computer skills in school–so what they know, they know in order survive socially: they use Snapchat, they text, they Facebook Message, they Tweet–but they don’t email.

Perhaps all that…

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Exploring the New Google Drive Add-Ons: Mail Chimp

mailchimpMany of you are completely unaware that Google Drive has, again, changed dramatically.

If you have been using Google Drive at all, and have been paying attention even a little bit, you probably noticed that little menu item at the top, but many have completely ignored the treasures that await beyond the tab marked, simply,  “Add-Ons.”

Add-Ons act somewhat like extensions in your browser.  They allow you to do things in Google Drive that you couldn’t do before–like accessing some awesome tools without leaving Drive.  Why would these companies want to contribute time and effort to make a Google Drive Add On? . . . for the simple reason that it brings awareness of what they have to offer to an amazingly broad audience that may have never known their product existed, let alone understand why they need it.

I see them as small gifts.  Tiny jewels hanging inside the cave of wonders known as Add-Ons . . . but that’s just me channelling my inner geek (or maybe not?).

One of those amazing gifts from Google’s new Add-Ons comes from an unlikely source: the e-mail distribution company Mail Chimp.  Mail Chimp is a young company, hungry for market-share, and dedicated to service.  They have their offices right here in Georgia, so I was already inclined to support them before I Continue reading →

Confessions of an Academic Platypus

imgresWOW. I have never been to an International Society of Technology and Education (ISTE) conference before.  In fact, I have never been a member of ISTE until now.  You see, ISTE is mostly a K-12 organization, so there were very few of us University Ivory Tower members there mixing with the hoi polloi of teaching.

But, I was there.  I was TOTALLY there.

Why? For the simple reason that K12 teachers are the change makers, the developers, the directors of the educational experiences our students have before entering college, and I wanted to see what they were up to, technologically. Also, frankly, I have somewhat lower expectations for what Higher Ed faculty are up to, technologically.

Innovation, Thy Name is K12.

I have come to the disturbing realization that most of the higher education establishment is dragging its heels on technology, and instead of being out in front of education (as we should be) and leading innovation, we spend our days hunched over the yellowed pages of bygone syllabi or lost in the netherworld of Learning Management Systems.

I can’t tell you how many times I have begged fellow faculty members to just take a quick look at what Google Drive can do, or how to use Zotero in the classroom.

It is difficult to explain to “Dean Scowl” (a.k.a. almost any Dean I have ever met) how important it is that I have adequate WIFI in my classroom so my students can build a PLN in Twitter, when Dean Scowl has never used Twitter (and doesn’t want to), doesn’t know what a PLN is (and doesn’t want to know), and spends our valuable 15 minutes together lecturing me on the importance of student confidentiality and the danger of using the internet.  Sigh.

EdTech-Higher Ed Edition

It was liberating, to say the least, to know that there is such a thing as a “Technology Coach” in K12, that those Technology Coaches are making real change possible in our school systems, and that both faculty and students are demonstrating daily (not just lecturing) that learning is a life-long process of: [innovate-attempt | innovate-fail | innovate-succeed | Repeat].  I would love to know when Technology Coaches are going to become something in the PostSecondary (i.e. HigherEd) world.  (I have the distinct impression that my skill-set is about five years ahead of the jobs–unfortunately!).

The Problem of Differentiation in Higher Education

There are two problems with differentiation in Higher Education:  One is that Higher Ed frowns on anyone who is out of their “niche,” . . . and the other is that the niches are ill-defined.

Let me explain.  First, I am always out of my niche (you guessed that, right?).  I’m SUPPOSED to be an English Professor. That means, of course, I should concern myself with literature and writing . . . but there is the problem.  Literature and writing have spilled out beyond the pages of books and onto screens.  It Continue reading →

Welcome to English 2112 World Literature

Dear Students,

I will be using this blog to post a lot of “outside of D2L” stuff that you can access.  Some of the students in the course were not able to access D2L, so I want to make sure they don’t fall behind.  This is what we are doing this week:

Checklist:

Read Syllabus (official)

Read Syllabus (unofficial)

Read “European Enlightenment”

Read “Introduction to Tartuffe”

Watch Tartuffe Video While Reading the Play

Participate in Discussion=I’ll keep it open so you can do it later!

Write and turn-in Translation Paragraph: Write one well-formed, well-worded paragraph on the following: When you listened to the video while reading the play, there were times when the translation differed significantly. Identify one specific word or line that was different, and explain why you thought one translation was better than the other.

I hope this helps!!

Playing with NGram Viewer

Originally posted on Dr. Kassorla's Blog:

3220614-batman-vs-superman-1-tptivirz0s-1024x768

Yesterday I spent a few hours on the phone with a similarly geeky friend, Fredrick, playing with NGram Viewer from Google.  If you have never been on NGram Viewer, I have to warn you–make sure you have enough time!!  We got sucked in quick, and we stayed a while.

NGram Viewer is a wonderful tool that allows you to enter one or more terms  into a search box.  Then, through the magic of Google (search, books, pictures, etc.), you receive a wonderful graph informing you of the popularity of whatever you have entered.

As we played with the tool, we were looking for ways to use it in the writing classroom to generate authentic research.  For example, we put the word “ipod” into the Ngram viewer and got the following results:

ipod jpg

Then, of course, we asked, “Why were people in 1800 and 1905 so crazy about ipods?”  It’s easy to…

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Don’t Waste Your Break! Learn Something!!

falling_snow3Most of us don’t know how to code.  I don’t.  

But, my dear students, I am trying to learn.

TRYING is the operative word here. Maybe I won’t get good at it, but if I keep trying, I am bound to learn something.

Spend a few weeks on your winter break learning to code.  It is something you will need for the rest of your life.  Below you will find a video, and a list of FREE sources to learn to code and/or to learn to code even better.  Get to it!!

Here’s a video to get your motivated:

Now go to any of these FREE sites to learn on your own!!

Codeacademy.org: Step by step, learn any language you want for free.  Great sandbox areas to learn and even local meetups if you get stuck.

Code.org: Advocacy organization with resources to get computer science into your schools and community.  They also have a directory for free”learn to code” events in your community.

Coderacer:  Learn to code with this free and easy computer game.

CodePlayer:  Learn how people made things by watching them do it.  A great “learn by watching someone else” site.  Then, join in and show others.

MIT Open Courseware: If you already know something and want to learn a lot more, this is a great site for motivated learners. You will find entire MIT courses here.

Udacity: Learn to code, or learn anything else you can think of.  This is a free and open courseware system!

Mozilla Developer Network:  Learn everything from the basics of coding to developing new software solutions.

Kahn Academy:  You know Dr. K loves Kahn Academy–and this is a great way to learn to code.  LOVE IT! (I think I’m doing this one, although the “CodeRacer” game looks like a blast too.

Great Infographic: Most Popular Books of all Time

I found this, and I had to post it.  So interesting!  Not only the information, but the way in which they organized the information for this infographic.  I love how they seemlessly integrated information and artwork.  Very impressive.

 

Mesopotamia: Lost Civilizations

In order to prepare us for our first discussion of World Literature, I would like you to have some context of not only the history of the literature, but the way in which that information was collected.

You will find that context in this Time-Life Video: Mesopotamia: Lost Civilizations.

It is approximately 50 minutes long, and will represent your first homework assignment of the semester:

A New Era: Atlanta Metropolitan State College

imgresDr. K just accepted a position at Atlanta Metropolitan State College as Assistant Professor of English!

If you are one of Dr. K’s former students–don’t worry!  I am still here for you!!  Just make sure you email me at my gmail account.

If you are one of Dr. K’s new students, welcome! We have a lot of learning ahead of us!!

 

CAU Academic Calendar 2013-14

I made a new academic calendar for CAU for 2013-14.

Feel free to use it, but remember this is not an OFFICIAL Calendar.  I have done my best to render it correctly, but if you use it, you use it at your own risk!

To use it with your own Google or iCal Calendar, click on the little plus sign on the bottom of the calendar I have posted here.

Dr. K

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